Posts Tagged ‘parlour’

  1. Regal Floral Parlor c.1920’s

    November 2, 2014

    DSCF7342Regal Floral parlor Circa early 1920’s

    We think the youtube clip says it all. So full and punchy makes for a great finger picker and/or a real blues belter

    $1425

    inc case.

    Video Uploading Soon


  2. American Hawaiian Vintage Parlor Guitar c. 1930’s

    October 22, 2014

    Hawaiian Vintage Parlor GuitarAmerican Hawaiian Vintage Parlor Guitar

    This little baby was so beautiful when we got her that the idea of “modding” her from a pin bridge to a string through body was not going to fly. So we did only what was needed; Neck reset, refret, replace broken bracings etc. Check out that decal, check out that label, would you do to a beautiful vintage parlor guitar than that?

    And she sounds amazing! History history history! It’s all here for very little

    $1295 inc Case

     


  3. Brisbane Guitar Restoration, what’s involved?

    June 10, 2014

    Brisbane Guitar Restoration – the full story

    Brisbane Guitar RestorationRestoring vintage and rare instruments is the driving passion behind us here at the Guitar Repairers. Seeing a beautiful old guitar from say the 1890’s restored to a playable condition is what makes all our hard work really pay off.

    Why do we do it?

    Well, from a luthiery point of view we restore old guitars because:

    • Older timber is much more resonant. Over time wood dries out and the dryer it is, the harder it is, causing it to resonate sound rather than absorb it. (even modern kiln dried timber is not completely dried out)
    • The less moisture there is in wood the less it will move over time. Through seasonal changes new wood still warps and moves. An older guitar has done all its moving and warping so we’re left with very sturdy timber.
    • The timbers used in older guitars are of very high quality. Brazilian rosewood- the best quality rosewood- for example was once used almost exclusively in old guitars. Now a protected species, it is no longer allowed to be cut down and sold. Some Honduras Mahogany and types of spruce are becoming sparse and their lower grade equivalents are being used instead.
    • They all have stories. Dings, dents, scratches and marks, these are all tell tale signs that a guitar has led an interesting life. Knowing that an old 1900’s parlour guitar from the US of A was once some young musicians bread and butter makes for a much more interesting history than some man named Django CMCing them from a factory in Moosejaw, Canada.

    (more…)


  4. Oscar Schmidt Parlour Guitar Circa 1920’s

    October 2, 2013

    DSCF4546

    The First Hawaiian Conservatory of Music was a marketing tool of the Oscar Schmidt Company of New York, started around 1919 and continued until the late 1930’s.  They would sell a guitar and 12 months of correspondence guitar lessons for a nominal down payment and monthly repayments.  They would advertise these courses in Popular Mechanics and other magazines of the period.

    The guitars they supplied with this course are now widely regarded, along with the Oscar Schmidt Stellas, as the cream of old blues guitars.  These rarely come up for sale in the US, and never in Australia.  Artists keep these guitars when they get a hold of them.  This guitar was used extensively in studio work in Alabama until we managed to get our hands on it!

    $1975 Sold